Sunday, November 23, 2014

Horse Apple

Does anyone recognize this?
It is a Bois d 'Arc Apple, Bodark Apple, or as I grew up calling it, a Horse Apple.

I never realized that the tree, that this large round fruit grew on, was indigenous to the area of the country that I grew up in. The North Texas portion of the Red River Valley. Related to a Mulberry tree, it's called an Osage-Orange Tree . It was given that name because an Indian Tribe (The Osage Indians), from the area, used the hard wood of the tree to make their bows. Bois d 'Arc in French, means bow wood.
I think it's interesting that this tree that usually grows to about 40 feet., was trimmed into hedgerows, prior to the invention of barbed wire, to fence in livestock, and fence out predators. I forgot to mention that the tree also produces a spiky thorn.
Horses do eat this pulpous fruit, as do birds and squirrels (who seem to eat just about anything).
* photo credit to: Kelley Ouchley 

I, by the way, and feeling much better. Thank you for all of the remedies! Rose I am still looking for that Queensland Olive Leaf Extract :) 

9 comments:

  1. A very peculiar apple indeed Janey :) glad to hear that you're on the mend, a bad cold can make you feel so horrible.

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  2. yes, i learned about bois d'arcs after moving to texas. i remember driving by some 'tennis balls' scattered on the street one day and wondering, 'what the heck?' we had one at our former home and only one of my 3 horses would eat the fruit. :)

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    1. I would advise against the horses eating them. Both horses and cows have choked to death of these things

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  3. What an unusual apple. I have never seen anything like it. Wonder what it tastes like.

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  4. This question about taste also has me curious. If animals are reluctant to eat it, I think I'd respect their judgment.

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    1. Oops I guess I forgot to mention that they are not edible..for humans. Actually, the seeds are..but they are difficult to get to and I wouldn't imagine they would taste very good. Squirrels seem to LOVE them!

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  5. We called them horse apples, too. :)
    Glad you are feeling better.

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  6. Ha! I don't think they export it Janey (the Olive Leaf)
    Wow, now I truly have never heard of nor seen anything quite like that ....apple. How clever that the trees were used to fence stock.

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  7. I have never seen something like this before! Never heard of it either. Interesting colour too.

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